Progressive Art Bruch

Join us on this extraordinary expedition through the realms of art — a calisthenic for the soul, an exercise in creativity, and a feast for the senses. Art Circuits at Large starts now

Progressive Brunch Sunday Tour

Let’ do some art calisthenic this Sunday.
our suggestion is start geographically from north to south or or the other way around.

Here we go:
Dot Fiftyone Gallery
N’Namdi Contemporary
Diana Lowenstain Gallery
Emerson Dorsch
Piero Atchugarry Gallery
Zilbermann Gallery
Pan American Arts Projects Design District
Allapatha
La Cometa
Mindy Solomon Gallery
Voloshyn Gallery
Andrew Reed Gallery
KDR
Frederic Snitzer
Ascaso Gallery

Launch map here

Gastronomy Miami – AFTER ART

Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Art. By Architect César Pelli, 1300 Biscayne Blvd. Miami, FL 33132 photo: Robin Hill ©.

Miami's Culinary Gems:

A Starlite Journey

In Miami, a total of 11 restaurants in Greater Miami & Miami Beach were honored with one MICHELIN star, and a singular establishment – L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon, nestled in the Miami Design District – proudly earned the only two-star rating in the state of Florida. These accolades are a testament to the city's culinary richness and innovation.

Two-Star Restaurants in Miami:

L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon: DESIGN DISTRICT, 151 NE. 41st St., Miami, 33137, French, Contemporary

One-Star Restaurants in Miami:

After you immerse yourself in the artistic marvels of Art Basel 2023, let Miami's Michelin Star restaurants elevate your cultural experience. With every dish meticulously crafted and every flavor thoughtfully curated, Miami invites you to embark on a gastronomic journey that mirrors the city's artistic spirit – vibrant, diverse, and utterly unforgettable. Indulge in the culinary masterpieces of Miami and let your taste buds savor the artistry that awaits in every bite.

Ariete: COCONUT GROVE, 3540 Main Hwy., Miami, 33133 Contemporary.

Boia De: LITTLE RIVER. 5205 NE. 2nd Ave., Miami, 33137 Contemporary, Italian.

Cote Miami: DESIGN DISTRICT, 3900 NE. 2nd Ave., Miami, 33137 Korean, Steakhouse.

Elcielo Restaurant: BRICKELL, 31 SE. 5th St., Miami, 33131, Colombian cuisine, Chef Juan Manuel Barrientos.

Hiden: WYNWOOD, 313 NW. 25th St., Miami, 33127, Japanese, Sushi, Chef Seijun Okano.

Le Jardinier: DESIGN DISTRICT, 151 NE. 41st St., Miami, 33137, French contemporary. Chef Alain Verzeroli.

Los Félix: COCONUT GROVE, 3413 Main Hwy., Miami, 33133 Mexican, Regional Cuisine.

Stubborn Seed: SOUTH BEACH, 101 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 33139. Contemporary, American. Chef Jeremy Ford.

Tambourine Room by Tristan Brandt: NORTH BEACH, 6801 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 33141. Contemporary, Asian. Chef Tristan Brandt.

The Den at Azabu Miami Beach: MIAMI BEACH, 161 Ocean Dr., Miami Beach, 33139, Japanese, Sushi.

The Surf Club Restaurant: SURFSIDE, 9011 Collins Ave., Surfside, 33154, American, Chef Thomas Keller.

After you immerse yourself in the artistic marvels of Art Basel 2023, let Miami's Michelin Star restaurants elevate your cultural experience. With every dish meticulously crafted and every flavor thoughtfully curated, Miami invites you to embark on a gastronomic journey that mirrors the city's artistic spirit – vibrant, diverse, and utterly unforgettable. Indulge in the culinary masterpieces of Miami and let your taste buds savor the artistry that awaits in every bite.

Private Art Collections: Transforming Miami in to a Global Art Destination

Ernesto Neto, É ô Bicho!, 2001, Courtesy of Margullies Collection at the Warehouse

Long gone are the days when Miami was solely a beach destination. Over the past twenty years the contemporary art scene in the magic city has grown to be vibrant and thought-provoking. This significant shift started when the Swiss fair Art Basel’s organizers decided to disseminate their cultural brand with an outpost in Miami Beach, what followed was a dramatic transformation and since then the city has embraced itself as a site ripe for the vigorous contemporary art scene.

Nowadays Miami is teeming with creative endeavors and artistic programming; there is a richness of Art Museums, there is also a wide selection of commercial art galleries and immersive art exhibits like Superblue. Yet, the treasure trove of this burgeoning art landscape is the existence of various private collections throughout the city that accept visitors.
A group of the city’s most prominent collectors have opened up art-filled spaces, so Miami has actually become one of the few places in the United States that has such a wealth of private collections that are accessible to the public all year-long. Fortunately, there is now a plethora of lavish dedicated spaces - several of them custom made- that present a wide variety of artworks ranging from Ye’kwana artifacts to contemporary works.
Amongst some of the private collectors that helped draw Art Basel to Miami were Don and Mera Rubell, who have been art enthusiasts for over 50 years and are one of the largest open private collections in the US (they own more than 7,500 works by more than 1,000 artists). According to some experts, they paved the way and catalyzed other art collectors to display their treasures to the general public. Thirty years ago, they opened their Collection in a former DEA warehouse in Wynwood; this helped transform the neighborhood which underwent a radical transformation and became a magnet for graffiti artists and art galleries, shops and restaurants. In 2019 the married couple moved their collection to the nearby Allapattah neighborhood and renamed their space the Rubell Museum. The Rubells have amassed a truly magnificent selection of contemporary art from the 1960s onward- it is one of the world’s most substantial- and includes masterpieces by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Martha Jungwirth, Jeff Koons and Louise Lawler amongst many others. The lavish 100,000 square-foot space includes 40 galleries, a library, and a lovely indoor-outdoor restaurant serving Michelin worthy basque food.
For this season, the Museum will have on view the exhibition of Basil Kincaid: Spirit in the Gift; and also, a showcase of paintings by the Cuban-born and Miami-based Alejandro Piñeiro Bello, in conjunction with other shows besides the Collection Highlights that include two Yoyai Kusama Infinity Rooms.

Yayoi Kusama, Narcissus Garden, (detail). 1966-, 700 stainless steel spheres, dimensions variable, Courtesy of Rubell Museum.
Yayoi Kusama, Narcissus Garden, (detail). 1966-, 700 stainless steel spheres, dimensions variable, Courtesy of Rubell Museum.
Olga de Amaral. Modular 77 (Agua2), 1977. Whool and Horsehair, 91 x 72 x 5 in. Courtesy of Jorge M. Pérez Collection.
Olga de Amaral. Modular 77 (Agua2), 1977. Whool and Horsehair, 91 x 72 x 5 in. Courtesy of Jorge M. Pérez Collection.

A couple of blocks away in the Allapattah neighborhood is El Espacio 23, a contemporary art space founded in 2019 by real estate tycoon and collector Jorge Perez, that can be perceived as a complement to the other artistic enterprise to which Perez has pledged his name and fortune: The Perez Art Museum of Miami (PAMM). El Espacio 23 is located within a repurposed 28,000 square-foot warehouse, on view will be To Weave the Sky: Textile Abstractions, survey presenting fiber-based works by over 100 intergenerational artists from around the world.

Nearby in the Wynwood Arts District is the Margulies Collection. Martin Z Margulies started collecting more than forty years ago and is currently lauded and recognized on lists such as the ARTnews Top 200 Collectors. His compendium of art is considered by art connoisseurs to be one of the most significant of its kind, it features works by some of the most famous names in art history. Housed in a 50,000 square foot retrofitted warehouse in the Wynwood District, the collection is presenting several new exhibitions including Helen Levitt: New York Street Photographer that showcases wonderfully vivacious snapshots of the inhabitants of poorer neighborhoods of the Big Apple in the 1930s and 1940s. From the many, many artworks displayed there are some unmissable pieces from the permanent collection from masters like Isamu Noguchi, Nancy Rubins and Michael Heizer, also noteworthy are some monumental early works by Anselm Kiefer that will impact audiences. It is worth mentioning that the Margulies Collection has a longstanding commitment to the welfare of underprivileged and disenfranchised people in Miami, the admission fees generated by Art week traffic are donated to the Lotus House - a shelter for women and children- so your admission charge will benefit the needy.

Ernesto Neto, É ô Bicho!, 2001, Courtesy of Margullies Collection at the Warehouse
Ernesto Neto, É ô Bicho!, 2001, Courtesy of Margullies Collection at the Warehouse

Another outstanding collecting couple: Rosa and Carlos de la Cruz who are originally from Cuba and built their art collection more than 30 years ago with an original focus of modern Latin American art which then evolved into contemporary international art. In 2009 they opened their collection to the public as a privately funded museum in Miami’s Design District that showcases works by Mark Bradford, Isa Genzken, Glenn Ligon and many others. Currently they own more than 1000 works, but it is acknowledged that the anchor of their collection is the work by Felix Gonzalez-Torres for whom the de la Cruz were not only patrons but close friends. Presently they are displaying the exhibition House in Motion / New Perspectives that represents the collection's history, bringing together paintings, sculptures, and site-specific installations.

de La Cruz Installation: House in Motion / New Perspectives, 2023–2024. Featuring work by Martin Kippenberger, Rufino Tamayo, Dana Schutz, Carlos Alfonzo, Gabriel Orozco, Salvador Dali, Rudolf Stingel, Ana Mendieta and Felix Gonzalez Torres. Courtesy de la Cruz Collection, Miami.
de La Cruz Installation: House in Motion / New Perspectives, 2023–2024. Featuring work by Martin Kippenberger, Rufino Tamayo, Dana Schutz, Carlos Alfonzo, Gabriel Orozco, Salvador Dali, Rudolf Stingel, Ana Mendieta and Felix Gonzalez Torres. Courtesy de la Cruz Collection, Miami.

Craig Robbins is known for helping modernize South Beach and for being the developer behind the Miami Design District. Furthermore, he also holds a very impressive collection of over 1200 pieces of art and design that are installed throughout his company’s corporate offices and exemplifies the thesis that art enhanced spaces foster vibrant communities. Located within the Design District headquarters of Dacra, the collection is open by appointment and will be showcasing A Train of Thoughts: Figuration and Conceptualism in Craig Robins Collection.

Isabelle Albuquerque, Orgy For 10 People In One Body no. 8, 2021 Human hair, coyote claws, resin, gold wedding band 20 x 28 1/2 x 66 in. Courtesy of Craig Robins Collection.
Isabelle Albuquerque, Orgy For 10 People In One Body no. 8, 2021 Human hair, coyote claws, resin, gold wedding band 20 x 28 1/2 x 66 in. Courtesy of Craig Robins Collection.

Within walking distance is the Juan Carlos Maldonado Collection, which was established in 2005 by the Venezuelan entrepreneur with the mission to contribute to the study and appreciation of Geometric Abstraction as a universal style that transcends geographies and cultural backgrounds. The exhibition presented this year traces back through the 18 years of the collection, including an array of Ye’kwana basketry that are in dialogue with some of the iconic pieces of Western geometric abstraction in the collection.

YE’KWANA Awídi amohadóto Remolino de 10 vueltas yekumédi 22.8 in diameter 2010
YE’KWANA Awídi amohadóto Remolino de 10 vueltas yekumédi 22.8 in diameter 2010
Installation view of Marquez Art Projects. Photo Isabela Villanueva
Installation view of Marquez Art Projects. Photo Isabela Villanueva

Last but not least is the recently inaugurated Marquez Art Projects, an 8,000-square-foot exhibition space in Allapattah that champions emerging visual artists founded by the real estate developer and restaurateur John Marquez. The space has four rooms that are populated with work created primarily in the last five years. Specifically planned to inaugurate during Art Week is Cusp a new body of work by Miami- and New York-based artist José Delgado Zuñiga.

Be sure to swing by and visit these extraordinary private collections that have been fundamental in transforming Miami into an art destination and continue to give value to our cultural community.

Isabela Villanueva
Art Historian and Curator

 

Miami Architecture: A Vibrant Tapestry Of Styles And Influences

South Point, Miami Beach. Photo courtesy GMCVB

Miami is a metropolis renowned for its diverse cultural influences, stunning beaches, and a 24/7 night life. Yet, beyond its vibrant culture and glamorous reputation lies a rich architectural landscape that reflects the city’s unique history, climate, and multi-cultural character.

Let’s delve into the world of Miami architecture, explore its evolution, key architectural styles, and iconic landmarks that define our urban paradise.

ART DECO:

Miami Beach, in particular, boasts one of the largest collections of Art Deco architecture in the world. These pastel-hued, streamlined structures, predominantly built in the 1930s and 1940s, exhibit the elegance and optimism of the era. Ocean Drive, with its neon signs and iconic facades, perfectly captures the essence of our community’s Art Deco District, which, by the way, is on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Helen Mar Apartment Hotel. By Robert E. Collins. 2421 Lake Pancoast Drive, Miami Beach. Photo: Robin Hill ©.
The Helen Mar Apartment Hotel. By Robert E. Collins. 2421 Lake Pancoast Drive, Miami Beach. Photo: Robin Hill ©.
1949 - The Charles Roman Residence. By Nims Roman, Photo courtesy of usmodernist.org

TROPICAL MODERNISM:

Miami’s climate has played a significant role in shaping its architectural identity. Tropical Modernism emerged as a response to the hot, humid weather. Characterized by open floor plans, large windows, and natural materials like wood and stone, architects like Alfred Browning Park and Rufus Nims pioneered this style in the mid-20th century.

MIMO:

Short for Miami Modernism architecture, MiMo is a post-war style that blends elements of Modernism with Miami twist. Look no further than the Fontainebleau hotel in Miami Beach to see an excellent example of MiMo’s use of curves, abstract shapes, and vivid colors.

South Point, Miami Beach. Photo courtesy GMCVB
South Point, Miami Beach. Photo courtesy GMCVB

CUBAN INFLUENCE:

Miami’s Cuban community has left an indelible mark on our city’s architectural landscape. The energetic neighborhood of Little Havana, for example, is a mosaic of colorful buildings, painted murals, and a lively street culture reminiscent of old Havana itself.

CONTEMPORARY & HIGH TECH:

As Miami has grown into a global business hub, contemporary architecture has taken hold. The city’s skyline is punctuated by sleek, glass skyscrapers, such as the iconic One Thousand Museum designed by Zaha Hadid, which stands as a symbol of Miami’s aspirations.

Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Art. By Architect César Pelli, 1300 Biscayne Blvd. Miami, FL 33132 photo: Robin Hill ©.
One Thousand Museum Building. By Zaha Hadid Architects, 1000 Biscayne Blvd. Miami, Fl 33132 Photo: Robin Hill ©.
One Thousand Museum Building. By Zaha Hadid Architects, 1000 Biscayne Blvd. Miami, Fl 33132 Photo: Robin Hill ©.

ICONIC LANDMARKS


The Freedom Tower:
Originally the headquarters of the Miami News & Metropolis, this historic building served as the “Ellis Island of the South.” It was the processing center for Cuban refugees fleeing Fidel Castro’s regime, and today it stands as a symbol of freedom and Cuban heritage. It is now home to the Museum of Art and Design.


Vizcaya Museum and Gardens:
This Italian Renaissance-style villa, built in the early 20th century, is surrounded by lush gardens and offers a glimpse into Miami’s past. Vizcaya’s opulence and beauty make it a must visit for architecture enthusiasts.

Miami -dade county courthouse Building. By Architects A. Ten Eyck Brown and August Geiger, 73 West Flagler Street in Miami Photo: Robin Hill ©.
Miami -dade county courthouse Building. By Architects A. Ten Eyck Brown and August Geiger, 73 West Flagler Street in Miami Photo: Robin Hill ©.Miami -dade county courthouse Building. By Architects A. Ten Eyck Brown and August Geiger, 73 West Flagler Street in Miami Photo: Robin Hill ©.
Brickell Arch, Conrad Miami. By Architects Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, Photo: Robin Hill ©.
Brickell Arch, Conrad Miami. By Architects Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, Photo: Robin Hill ©.

The Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM):
Designed by Herzog & de Meuron, PAMM is a contemporary architectural gem overlooking Biscayne Bay. Its hanging gardens, concrete structure, and impressive use of natural light make it a prime example of modern Miami architecture.
Miami’s architectural diversity is a reflection of its vibrant and multi-cultural identity. From the pastel Art Deco beauties of South Beach to the sleek contemporary skyscrapers of downtown, Miami’s architectural landscape is as diverse as its population. It is a city where the past, present, and future co-exist, creating a visual feast for architecture enthusiasts and a testament to our city’s unique spirit. As Miami continues to evolve, its architecture will undoubtedly continue to tell the captivating story of the Magic City!

Cheryl Jacobs
Art Circuits Contributor

Executive Vice President
Miami Center For Architecture & Design